Last edited by Shashura
Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

9 edition of Opera in seventeenth-century Venice found in the catalog.

Opera in seventeenth-century Venice

Ellen Rosand

Opera in seventeenth-century Venice

the creation of a genre

by Ellen Rosand

  • 321 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by University of California Press in Berkeley .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Italy,
  • Venice
    • Subjects:
    • Opera -- Italy -- Venice -- 17th century

    • Edition Notes

      StatementEllen Rosand.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsML1733.8.V4 R67 1991
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxxii, 684 p. :
      Number of Pages684
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1879932M
      ISBN 100520068084
      LC Control Number90040399

      Book Description. The past four decades have seen an explosion in research regarding seventeenth-century opera. In addition to investigations of extant scores and librettos, scholars have dealt with the associated areas of dance and scenery, as well as newer disciplines such as studies of patronage, gender, and semiotics. Glixon, ‘Marco Faustini and Venetian Opera Production in the s: Recent Archival Discoveries’, Journal of Musicology, 10 (), 48– They will be explored further in their forthcoming book on opera production in mid-seventeenth-century Venice, which will .

      This article describes what it was like to attend the very first operas that were composed and performed during the early seventeenth century and were made popular in the commercial theaters in Venice. It studies the complications of early opera placed upon composers and dramatists, and shows that female voices in the opera were “echoed” by the female singers in : Edward Wallace Muir. Censoring Eliogabalo in Seventeenth-Century Venice In the letter to the reader that begins his short treatise On Honest Dissimulation (), Torquato Accetto writes that his book has been left "almost bloodless" by self-inflicted wounds. "You will recognize the .

        In mid seventeenth-century Venice, opera first emerged from courts and private drawing rooms to become a form of public entertainment. Early commercial operas were elaborate spectacles, featuring ornate costumes and set design along with dancing and music/5. After discussing the management of comedy theaters in Venice, this chapter examines the financial structure behind the opera business, exploring various sources of income, such as investors, loans, rental of seats and boxes, advances from the printer, and ticket sales. While the renters and managers of the comedy theaters usually came from the noble class, opera theaters tended to be run by.


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Opera in seventeenth-century Venice by Ellen Rosand Download PDF EPUB FB2

Ellen Rosand shows how opera, born of courtly entertainment, took root in the special social and economic environment of seventeenth-century Venice and there developed the stylistic and aesthetic characteristics we recognize as opera today/5(2).

Ellen Rosand shows how opera, born of courtly entertainment, took root in the special social and economic environment of seventeenth-century Venice and there developed the stylistic and aesthetic characteristics we recognize as opera today/5.

About the Book Ellen Rosand shows how opera, born of courtly entertainment, took root in the special social and economic environment of seventeenth-century Venice and there developed the stylistic and aesthetic characteristics we recognize as opera today.

Opera in Seventeenth-Century Venice: The Creation of a Genre by Ellen Rosand available in Trade Paperback onalso read synopsis and reviews. Ellen Rosand shows how opera, born of courtly entertainment, took root in the special social and Author: Ellen Rosand. In mid seventeenth-century Venice, opera first emerged from courts and private drawing rooms to become a form of public entertainment.

Early commercial operas were elaborate spectacles, featuring ornate costumes and set design along with dancing and by: 1. Opera in seventeenth-century Venice: the creation of a genre. User Review - Not Available - Book Verdict. Opera was new in the 17th century, and Venice provided the environment in which it was to develop and flourish.

Rosand (music, Rutgers Univ.) builds 5/5(1). Opera in Seventeenth-Century Venice builds on this previous scholarship.

Although it aims to survey the entire field, from a variety of perspectives, its particular agenda is signaled by its subtitle: The Creation of a Genre.

Its thesis, as already suggested, is that opera received its most lasting theoretical, as well as practical, definition in the public theaters of seicento Venice. It is now almost forty years since Simon Towneley Worsthorne's Venetian Opera in the Seventeenth Century was first published.

The first substantial monograph in any language to deal with the early history of the genre on the stages of the Serenissima, Worsthorne's book was motivated by the belief that "the Venetian favole in musica. "This remarkably original book makes a substantial contribution to the history of Venetian opera.

Working from the now well-established point of view that opera was a preeminent social and political phenomenon in seventeenth-century Venice, Heller has expanded the sociopolitical arena to include issues of gender.

Ellen Rosand shows how opera, born of courtly entertainment, took root in the special social and economic environment of seventeenth-century Venice and there developed the stylistic and aesthetic characteristics we recognize as opera today.

With ninety-one music examples, most of them complete pieces nowhere else in print, and enlivened by 5/5(4). Opera in Seventeenth-Century Venice: Acknowledgments: Various aria books published during the s contain pieces that utilize the pattern, Given the prevailing attitude toward dramatic verisimilitude in opera of the s, of which he was the leading advocate, Cavalli must have found it difficult to set laments as formal arias.

Opera in Seventeenth-Century Venice The Creation of a Genre Ellen Rosand UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRESS Search within this book Bookbag About Us Help Opera in Seventeenth-Century Venice The Rise of Commercial Opera: 4— La finta pazza: Mirror of an Audience: 5— All'immortalità del nome di Venetia: The Serenissima on Stage: 6.

In this book, Emily Wilbourne boldly traces the roots of early opera back to the sounds of the commedia dell’arte.

Along the way, she forges a new history of Italian opera, from the court pieces of the early seventeenth century to the public stages of Venice more than fifty years later. Ellen Rosand shows how opera, born of courtly entertainment, took root in the special social and economic environment of seventeenth-century Venice and there developed the stylistic and aesthetic characteristics we recognize as opera today.5/5(4).

Ellen Rosand shows how opera, born of courtly entertainment, took root in the special social and economic environment of seventeenth-century Venice and there developed the stylistic and /5(10).

Ellen Rosand is an American musicologist, historian, and opera critic who specializes in Italian music and poetry of the 16th through 18th centuries. Her work has been particularly focused on the music and culture of Venice and Italian opera of the baroque era. She is an acknowledged expert on the operas of Handel and Vivaldi, and on Venetian opera.

In mid seventeenth-century Venice, opera first emerged from courts and private drawing rooms to become a form of public entertainment. Early commercial operas were elaborate spectacles, featuring 5/5(1). Ellen Rosand shows how opera, born of courtly entertainment, took root in the special social and economic environment of seventeenth-century Venice and there developed the stylistic and aesthetic characteristics we recognize as opera today.

With ninety-one music examples, most of them complete pieces nowhere else in print, and enlivened by twenty-eight illustrations, this landmark study. Opera -- Italy -- Venice -- 17th century.

See also what's at your library, or elsewhere. Broader terms: Opera -- Italy -- Venice; 17th century; Filed under: Opera -- Italy -- Venice -- 17th century Opera in Seventeenth-Century Venice: The Creation of a Genre (Berkeley: University of California Press, ), by Ellen Rosand (HTML at UC Press); Items below (if any) are from related and broader.

Ellen Rosand shows how opera, born of courtly entertainment, took root in the special social and economic environment of seventeenth-century Venice and there developed the stylistic and aesthetic characteristics we recognize as opera today.

With ninety-one music examples, most of them Author: Ellen Rosand. This book explores public opera in its infancy, from towhen theater owners and impresarios, drawing on the models of the already existent theaters for comedy, established Venice as the operatic capital of Europe.In mid-seventeenth-century Venice, opera was introduced to a public that was already accustomed to examining the position of women in society.² As residents of one of the major European publishing centers, the citizens of Venice could read a vast array of books concerning the training and education of women, their appropriate behaviors, their virtues and vices, and their position within early modern .In mid seventeenth-century Venice, opera first emerged from courts and private drawing rooms to become a form of public entertainment.

Early commercial operas were elaborate spectacles, featuring ornate costumes and set design along with dancing and music. As ambitious works of theater, these productions required not only significant financial backing, but also strong managers to oversee.